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AFP covers global news through its network of video journalists who provide video production 24 hours per day with consistently high image, video writing and script quality.

The Agency was the first to provide video in High Definition. AFP offers a complete range of editorial formats, from raw footage to fully edited and voiced investigative reporting.

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    AFP produces on average 200 videos per day, from breaking news to timeless feature pieces.

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    Videos are available in French, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic and Polish.

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    Products adapted for different broadcast, web, tablet, mobile formats, etc.

AFP’s 200 bureaux produce more than 200 videos in 7 languages daily.

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AFP provides video coverage 24 hours per day right from where events are taking place, as well as daily and weekly production forecasts.

Over 90 video production centres supported by AFP’s 200 bureaux produce more than 200 videos in 7 languages daily.

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  • 25/07/2014 - 18:36

    Afghan protesters rally against Israeli attacks on Gaza

    Kabul, AFGHANISTAN. July 25, 2014Source: AFP- VAR of Afghan protesters gathering for a demonstration against the ongoing Israeli attacks on Gaza- Afghan protesters hold up Palestinian flags while shouting slogans - Afghan protesters set fire to an Israeli flag- Afghan protesters shout slogans as they rally- An Afghan protester steps on the US flag during a demonstration against the ongoing Israeli attacks on Gaza- VAR of Afghan protesters torching effigies representing Israeli prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu///NO AFP TEXT STORY

  • 24/07/2014 - 07:18

    Death toll hits 48 after Taiwan plane crash

    TAIPEI, TAIWAN. 24 JULY 2014SOURCE: AFPTV IMAGES - 00:50 - Pan of the terminal of domestic flights at Songsang Airport- VAR of the TransAsia counter- Electronic board showing domestic flights- Close-up of board - VAR of passengers lining up at the TransAsia baggage check-in///-----------------------------------------------AFP TEXT STORY:Taiwan plane crash toll hits 48, officials defend flight clearance / Magong (Taiwan) - 24 July 2014 12:04 - AFP (Sam YEH) Taiwanese officials Thursday defended flight clearance given to a plane which crashed while trying to land during stormy weather, killing 48 people, as sobbing relatives gathered to identify their loved ones.Flight GE222 was carrying 54 passengers and four crew members on a domestic flight when it crashed on Wednesday at Magong on the Penghu island chain, with ten surviving the disaster.Two French medical students were among the dead, the foreign ministry in Paris said.The ATR 72-500 was flying from the southwestern city of Kaohsiung to the islands off the west coast and had been delayed by bad weather as Typhoon Matmo pounded Taiwan, according to authorities.It was trying to land for a second time after aborting the first attempt during thunder and heavy rain, crashing into two houses near Magong airport and injuring five people on the ground, officials said.Questions have been raised about why the flight was allowed to go ahead so soon after the typhoon."Many people were questioning why the plane took off in typhoon weather... according to my understanding the meteorology data showed that it met the aviation safety requirements," transport minister Yeh Kuang-shih told reporters. Officials said that two planes had landed safely at Magong airport shortly before the disaster.On Thursday, the scattered remains of the plane could be seen as more than 100 rescuers -- including firefighters and soldiers -- worked to remove bodies and debris from the scene. - Relatives identify the dead - It was not clear if all the bodies had been removed from the crash site. At a nearby funeral home, dozens of relatives -- including the elderly and children -- sobbed as they waited to identify whether their loved ones had been killed. Volunteers tried to comfort them as headshot photographs of the victims were posted on the wall to help with identification. Penghu county deputy fire chief Hsu Wen-kuang said it took firefighters almost an hour to douse fires after the plane burst into flames on impact.Investigators are looking into the cause of the crash, including why the plane was cleared to fly in bad weather.The airline said the pilot was 60-year-old Lee Yi-liang who has 22 years of experience, accumulating nearly 23,000 flight hours. The co-pilot was 39-year-old Chiang Kuan-hsin with two and a half years of experience.As some relatives arrived in Penghu, others were seen waiting at the airports in Kaohsiung and Taipei to get on a flight to Penghu.The mother of one survivor said: "My daughter called me. She said 'mum, my plane crashed'. She said she climbed out and borrowed a phone from others." TransAsia, Taiwan's first private airline, also runs international flights to China, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Vietnam. It is due to launch the island's first low-cost airline later this year.TransAsia said it planned to compensate each family of the deceased with Tw$1 million ($33,000), and offer Tw$200,000 to each of the injured.The last civilian plane crash in Taiwan was in 2002 when a China Airlines plane bound for Hong Kong crashed off Penghu islands into the Taiwan Strait, killing all 225 crew and passengers on board.An ATR-72 operated by Lao Airlines crashed during a heavy storm in southern Laos in October 2013, killing all 49 people on board.aw/pdh

  • 21/07/2014 - 19:59

    Gaza paramedics bonded by risks and horrors of war

    SUGGESTED SCRIPT:In this Gaza ambulance team, paramedics are working 24-hour shifts, some fasting and most getting little rest, as the conflict between Hamas and Israel drags on. Theirs is the gruesome task of recovering body parts, dead children, or victims in need of urgent care while dodging Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire. SOUNDBITE 1 - Adel al-Azbut, paramedic (Man, Arabic, 10 sec) -  “The ambulance worker is the one who arrives first, so he sees with his own eyes what has happened, what the injuries look like, what the situation is, what the truth is.” Sometimes their mission isn't so straightforward. This frightened family was pinned down in the Shejaiya neighborhood during an intense night of Israeli bombing. They needed help escaping and so they turned to the paramedics, who were ready to go where most people simply would not, to rescue them.The risks are enormous. These paramedics are burying a colleague Fuad Jaber who was killed when his ambulance was hit by an Israeli rocket. SOUNDBITE 2 - Relative of Fuad Jaber (woman, Arabic, 6 sec): "He wasn't a fighter, he was a fighter for humanity, he was an ambulance worker, why did he deserve to die?" The day that Fuad was killed, over 400 people had already lost their lives in Gaza in nearly two weeks of conflict.Watching their colleague's two year old daughter cry, their own families come to mind. SOUNDBITE 3 - Jihad Selim, paramedic (man, Arabic, 14 sec) - "The situation is very hard, we're in a war that is affecting everyone, the citizens, the paramedics themselves. They don't go home, they're only able to check on their families by phone, it's tense."But there is little time to reflect. Another call has come in, and the team is on its way to help with little idea of what might be waiting for them and just each other to count on. GAZA CITY, PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES. 20 JULY 2014SOURCE: AFPTVIMAGES - 01:45- VAR of an ambulance driving in Gaza city-VAR of the workers at the office-VAR of the ambulance arriving at a home with a family waiting-VAR of the family getting into the ambulance-VAR of the family in the ambulance -VAR of the body of a colleague being carried - VAR of the ambulance drivers watching their colleague being carried- VAR of the daughter of their colleague crying in a relatives arms- VAR of the paramedics heading out-VAR of the view of the paramedics from the ambulanceEXTRA RUSHES - 01:02- VAR of an ambulance driving in Gaza city-VAR of the workers praying-VAR of the workers at the office- VAR of an ambulance driving in Gaza city-VAR of the workers at the office///-----------------------------------------------------------AFP TEXT STORY:Gaza paramedics 'brothers' bonded by horrors of war / Gaza City (Palestinian Territories) - 21 July 2014 14:23 - AFP (Sara HUSSEIN) At a dingy Gaza ambulance station, paramedics struggle to stay awake during 24-hour shifts that see them coming under fire and dealing with the deaths of civilians and even colleagues.The men describe themselves as a family, bonded together by experiences that are difficult to comprehend.They have collected body parts and dead children; they have been trapped between Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire; and several of them have been wounded.Shift supervisor Jihad Selim has been a paramedic for 17 years and has no regrets, despite having worked through three wars and the violence of the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising (2000-2005).But he wouldn't want to see his children follow in his footsteps."The things we see are very hard," he told AFP. "We go into a house and we find a body torn into pieces, someone picks up a hand and gives it to you and says 'take it'."But these are things we're used to."Adel al-Azbut, 30, is similarly stoical about the horrors they encounter on a daily basis."To be honest, I just get on with it," he says."If I see pieces of a body, my professional responsibility requires that I just deal with situations like that and do it in a professional way."Adding to the pressure is that fact that they all have families at home, and many admit that their deepest fear is getting an emergency call from their own home. - Non-stop calls - Azbut decided he wanted to be a paramedic during the second intifada, impressed by the work done by first responders treating people in the Gaza Strip."The best thing for any human being to be able to do is to help another human being," he says."I'm honoured that I'm someone who is able to help people."In the background, the phone rings constantly.Often it is nothing more than children, bored at home, who ring the emergency service's toll-free number for fun."The worst thing that ever happened to us was them making our number toll-free. Now in Gaza, if you want to make sure the sound on your phone is working, you call our number," Selim says ruefully.But often it is far more serious.Families living in flashpoint border areas sometimes make desperate calls in the hope of being evacuated by ambulance, but Selim can't send anyone without first coordinating with the International Committee of the Red Cross.On Sunday morning, paramedic Fuad Jaber was killed in the Shejaiya neighbourhood during an intense Israeli bombardment that killed at least 72 people.A convoy of ambulances escorted his body to the family home, his colleagues weeping openly as his body was carried in to his wife and two-year-old daughter. - Brothers in suffering - But even during wartime, there are more ordinary emergencies.An ambulance speeds through the streets to find an eight-year-old girl who has fallen from the third floor of a building.The paramedics put splits on her legs, her neck in a brace and take her and her frantic parents to Gaza City's Shifa hospital."Sometimes it's shelling, sometimes it's an accident. During wartime, we get a cocktail," says the attending paramedic with a smile.Selim says the latest conflict, which began on July 8, has been even worse than the previous two Israeli operations in 2008-9 and 2012."Every war is more difficult than the one before, to be honest. There isn't a country in the world that has had to deal with three wars in six years," he says.But the paramedics pull together to support one another."We're like a family here and we treat each other like that, we're like brothers," Selim says."We deal with situations together, we help each other out, we sleep and wake up together."For all the suffering they experience, or perhaps because of it, the atmosphere at their ambulance station is lighthearted.The men argue over what they'll have for dessert with the dinner that breaks the daytime fast observed by Muslims during Ramadan and and who had the hardest shift last night."We try to keep it light," says Azbut."Because we know at any minute a call could come and we'll all go out and we don't know who will come back."

  • 21/07/2014 - 20:01

    Gaza paramedics bonded by risks and horrors of war

    SCRIPT:In this Gaza ambulance team, paramedics are working 24-hour shifts, some fasting and most getting little rest, as the conflict between Hamas and Israel drags on. Theirs is the gruesome task of recovering body parts, dead children, or victims in need of urgent care while dodging Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire. SOUNDBITE 1 - Adel al-Azbut, paramedic (Man, Arabic, 10 sec) -  “The ambulance worker is the one who arrives first, so he sees with his own eyes what has happened, what the injuries look like, what the situation is, what the truth is.” Sometimes their mission isn't so straightforward. This frightened family was pinned down in the Shejaiya neighborhood during an intense night of Israeli bombing. They needed help escaping and so they turned to the paramedics, who were ready to go where most people simply would not, to rescue them.The risks are enormous. These paramedics are burying a colleague Fuad Jaber who was killed when his ambulance was hit by an Israeli rocket. SOUNDBITE 2 - Relative of Fuad Jaber (woman, Arabic, 6 sec): "He wasn't a fighter, he was a fighter for humanity, he was an ambulance worker, why did he deserve to die?" The day that Fuad was killed, over 400 people had already lost their lives in Gaza in nearly two weeks of conflict.Watching their colleague's two year old daughter cry, their own families come to mind. SOUNDBITE 3 - Jihad Selim, paramedic (man, Arabic, 14 sec) - "The situation is very hard, we're in a war that is affecting everyone, the citizens, the paramedics themselves. They don't go home, they're only able to check on their families by phone, it's tense."But there is little time to reflect. Another call has come in, and the team is on its way to help with little idea of what might be waiting for them and just each other to count on. GAZA CITY, PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES. 20 JULY 2014SOURCE: AFPTVIMAGES - 01:45- VAR of an ambulance driving in Gaza city-VAR of the workers at the office-VAR of the ambulance arriving at a home with a family waiting-VAR of the family getting into the ambulance-VAR of the family in the ambulance -VAR of the body of a colleague being carried - VAR of the ambulance drivers watching their colleague being carried- VAR of the daughter of their colleague crying in a relatives arms- VAR of the paramedics heading out-VAR of the view of the paramedics from the ambulance///-----------------------------------------------------------AFP TEXT STORY:Gaza paramedics 'brothers' bonded by horrors of war / Gaza City (Palestinian Territories) - 21 July 2014 14:23 - AFP (Sara HUSSEIN) At a dingy Gaza ambulance station, paramedics struggle to stay awake during 24-hour shifts that see them coming under fire and dealing with the deaths of civilians and even colleagues.The men describe themselves as a family, bonded together by experiences that are difficult to comprehend.They have collected body parts and dead children; they have been trapped between Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire; and several of them have been wounded.Shift supervisor Jihad Selim has been a paramedic for 17 years and has no regrets, despite having worked through three wars and the violence of the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising (2000-2005).But he wouldn't want to see his children follow in his footsteps."The things we see are very hard," he told AFP. "We go into a house and we find a body torn into pieces, someone picks up a hand and gives it to you and says 'take it'."But these are things we're used to."Adel al-Azbut, 30, is similarly stoical about the horrors they encounter on a daily basis."To be honest, I just get on with it," he says."If I see pieces of a body, my professional responsibility requires that I just deal with situations like that and do it in a professional way."Adding to the pressure is that fact that they all have families at home, and many admit that their deepest fear is getting an emergency call from their own home. - Non-stop calls - Azbut decided he wanted to be a paramedic during the second intifada, impressed by the work done by first responders treating people in the Gaza Strip."The best thing for any human being to be able to do is to help another human being," he says."I'm honoured that I'm someone who is able to help people."In the background, the phone rings constantly.Often it is nothing more than children, bored at home, who ring the emergency service's toll-free number for fun."The worst thing that ever happened to us was them making our number toll-free. Now in Gaza, if you want to make sure the sound on your phone is working, you call our number," Selim says ruefully.But often it is far more serious.Families living in flashpoint border areas sometimes make desperate calls in the hope of being evacuated by ambulance, but Selim can't send anyone without first coordinating with the International Committee of the Red Cross.On Sunday morning, paramedic Fuad Jaber was killed in the Shejaiya neighbourhood during an intense Israeli bombardment that killed at least 72 people.A convoy of ambulances escorted his body to the family home, his colleagues weeping openly as his body was carried in to his wife and two-year-old daughter. - Brothers in suffering - But even during wartime, there are more ordinary emergencies.An ambulance speeds through the streets to find an eight-year-old girl who has fallen from the third floor of a building.The paramedics put splits on her legs, her neck in a brace and take her and her frantic parents to Gaza City's Shifa hospital."Sometimes it's shelling, sometimes it's an accident. During wartime, we get a cocktail," says the attending paramedic with a smile.Selim says the latest conflict, which began on July 8, has been even worse than the previous two Israeli operations in 2008-9 and 2012."Every war is more difficult than the one before, to be honest. There isn't a country in the world that has had to deal with three wars in six years," he says.But the paramedics pull together to support one another."We're like a family here and we treat each other like that, we're like brothers," Selim says."We deal with situations together, we help each other out, we sleep and wake up together."For all the suffering they experience, or perhaps because of it, the atmosphere at their ambulance station is lighthearted.The men argue over what they'll have for dessert with the dinner that breaks the daytime fast observed by Muslims during Ramadan and and who had the hardest shift last night."We try to keep it light," says Azbut."Because we know at any minute a call could come and we'll all go out and we don't know who will come back."

  • 21/07/2014 - 20:00

    Gaza paramedics bonded by risks and horrors of war

    SCRIPT:In this Gaza ambulance team, paramedics are working 24-hour shifts, some fasting and most getting little rest, as the conflict between Hamas and Israel drags on. Theirs is the gruesome task of recovering body parts, dead children, or victims in need of urgent care while dodging Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire. SOUNDBITE 1 - Adel al-Azbut, paramedic (Man, Arabic, 10 sec) -  “The ambulance worker is the one who arrives first, so he sees with his own eyes what has happened, what the injuries look like, what the situation is, what the truth is.” Sometimes their mission isn't so straightforward. This frightened family was pinned down in the Shejaiya neighborhood during an intense night of Israeli bombing. They needed help escaping and so they turned to the paramedics, who were ready to go where most people simply would not, to rescue them.The risks are enormous. These paramedics are burying a colleague Fuad Jaber who was killed when his ambulance was hit by an Israeli rocket. SOUNDBITE 2 - Relative of Fuad Jaber (woman, Arabic, 6 sec): "He wasn't a fighter, he was a fighter for humanity, he was an ambulance worker, why did he deserve to die?" The day that Fuad was killed, over 400 people had already lost their lives in Gaza in nearly two weeks of conflict.Watching their colleague's two year old daughter cry, their own families come to mind. SOUNDBITE 3 - Jihad Selim, paramedic (man, Arabic, 14 sec) - "The situation is very hard, we're in a war that is affecting everyone, the citizens, the paramedics themselves. They don't go home, they're only able to check on their families by phone, it's tense."But there is little time to reflect. Another call has come in, and the team is on its way to help with little idea of what might be waiting for them and just each other to count on. GAZA CITY, PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES. 20 JULY 2014SOURCE: AFPTVIMAGES - 01:45- VAR of an ambulance driving in Gaza city-VAR of the workers at the office-VAR of the ambulance arriving at a home with a family waiting-VAR of the family getting into the ambulance-VAR of the family in the ambulance -VAR of the body of a colleague being carried - VAR of the ambulance drivers watching their colleague being carried- VAR of the daughter of their colleague crying in a relatives arms- VAR of the paramedics heading out-VAR of the view of the paramedics from the ambulance///-----------------------------------------------------------AFP TEXT STORY:Gaza paramedics 'brothers' bonded by horrors of war / Gaza City (Palestinian Territories) - 21 July 2014 14:23 - AFP (Sara HUSSEIN) At a dingy Gaza ambulance station, paramedics struggle to stay awake during 24-hour shifts that see them coming under fire and dealing with the deaths of civilians and even colleagues.The men describe themselves as a family, bonded together by experiences that are difficult to comprehend.They have collected body parts and dead children; they have been trapped between Israeli shelling and Hamas sniper fire; and several of them have been wounded.Shift supervisor Jihad Selim has been a paramedic for 17 years and has no regrets, despite having worked through three wars and the violence of the second Palestinian intifada, or uprising (2000-2005).But he wouldn't want to see his children follow in his footsteps."The things we see are very hard," he told AFP. "We go into a house and we find a body torn into pieces, someone picks up a hand and gives it to you and says 'take it'."But these are things we're used to."Adel al-Azbut, 30, is similarly stoical about the horrors they encounter on a daily basis."To be honest, I just get on with it," he says."If I see pieces of a body, my professional responsibility requires that I just deal with situations like that and do it in a professional way."Adding to the pressure is that fact that they all have families at home, and many admit that their deepest fear is getting an emergency call from their own home. - Non-stop calls - Azbut decided he wanted to be a paramedic during the second intifada, impressed by the work done by first responders treating people in the Gaza Strip."The best thing for any human being to be able to do is to help another human being," he says."I'm honoured that I'm someone who is able to help people."In the background, the phone rings constantly.Often it is nothing more than children, bored at home, who ring the emergency service's toll-free number for fun."The worst thing that ever happened to us was them making our number toll-free. Now in Gaza, if you want to make sure the sound on your phone is working, you call our number," Selim says ruefully.But often it is far more serious.Families living in flashpoint border areas sometimes make desperate calls in the hope of being evacuated by ambulance, but Selim can't send anyone without first coordinating with the International Committee of the Red Cross.On Sunday morning, paramedic Fuad Jaber was killed in the Shejaiya neighbourhood during an intense Israeli bombardment that killed at least 72 people.A convoy of ambulances escorted his body to the family home, his colleagues weeping openly as his body was carried in to his wife and two-year-old daughter. - Brothers in suffering - But even during wartime, there are more ordinary emergencies.An ambulance speeds through the streets to find an eight-year-old girl who has fallen from the third floor of a building.The paramedics put splits on her legs, her neck in a brace and take her and her frantic parents to Gaza City's Shifa hospital."Sometimes it's shelling, sometimes it's an accident. During wartime, we get a cocktail," says the attending paramedic with a smile.Selim says the latest conflict, which began on July 8, has been even worse than the previous two Israeli operations in 2008-9 and 2012."Every war is more difficult than the one before, to be honest. There isn't a country in the world that has had to deal with three wars in six years," he says.But the paramedics pull together to support one another."We're like a family here and we treat each other like that, we're like brothers," Selim says."We deal with situations together, we help each other out, we sleep and wake up together."For all the suffering they experience, or perhaps because of it, the atmosphere at their ambulance station is lighthearted.The men argue over what they'll have for dessert with the dinner that breaks the daytime fast observed by Muslims during Ramadan and and who had the hardest shift last night."We try to keep it light," says Azbut."Because we know at any minute a call could come and we'll all go out and we don't know who will come back."

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